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Motivation vs. Movement

As educators, we often find ourselves in a position where we need to motivate our students to learn and achieve their goals. We tend to think that motivation is the key to success, but what if I told you that it's not always the case? What if I told you that small but calculated movements can actually create motivation, and not relying solely on motivation to create movement? This is this idea behind the Movement vs Motivation debate.



Motivation is the driving force behind most things we do in life. We need motivation to get out of bed in the morning, to go to work, and to pursue our goals. However, motivation can be fickle and unpredictable. We can feel motivated one day and completely unmotivated the next. So, how can we create a sustainable approach to learning and achieving our goals?


This is where movement comes in. Movement refers to taking small but calculated steps towards achieving our goals. These steps may not feel like much, but they create momentum and momentum creates motivation. For example, instead of waiting for motivation to strike before starting a task, break it down into smaller, more manageable steps. Celebrate the small victories along the way, and gradually build momentum towards achieving the larger goal.


As educators, we can apply this approach in the classroom. Instead of relying solely on motivation to encourage our students to learn, we can encourage them to take small but meaningful steps towards their goals. For example, if a student is struggling with a particular subject, we can break down the material into smaller, more manageable chunks. We can celebrate each small victory along the way and gradually build momentum towards mastering the subject.



The key to this approach is to focus on progress, not perfection. We often get bogged down by the idea of perfection, and this can lead to procrastination and lack of motivation. Instead, we should encourage our students to focus on progress, no matter how small. By doing so, we create a positive and sustainable learning environment that promotes growth and achievement.

In conclusion, the Movement vs Motivation debate highlights the importance of taking small but calculated steps towards achieving our goals. While motivation is important, it can be fickle and unpredictable.


By focusing on movement, we create momentum that leads to motivation. As educators, we can apply this approach in the classroom by encouraging our students to focus on progress, not perfection. By doing so, we create a positive and sustainable learning environment that promotes growth and achievement

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